Decision Making

Handbook of Process Tracing Methods

WOOP WOOP - here it is - the second edition of our beloved “Handbook of Process Tracing Methods” If you can’t wait - buy it here: https://www.crcpress.com/A-Handbook-of-Process-Tracing-Methods-2nd-Edition/Schulte-Mecklenbeck-Kuehberger-Johnson/p/book/9781138064218 It is bigger and better than the first edition, comes with the classics (Figner on skin conductance, Willemsen on Mouselab and many more) and many new awesome chapters - here is a list:

Professor priming - or not

This was my first contribution to a Registered Replication Report (RRR). Being one of 40 participating labs was an interesting exercise – it might seem straightforward to run the same study in different labs, but we learned that such small things as ü, ä and ö can generate a huge amount of problems and work (read this if you are into these kind of things).

A short history of process tracing

Finally out (already mentioned earlier this year) – now in it’s full glory @ Current Directions in Psychological Science. Good Stuff. a little process tracing history together with the delightful @dggoldst https://t.

Growing up to be old

Some papers have somewhat weird starting points – this one had an awesome starting point – Lake Louise (Canada): In a little suite we ( Joe Johnson, Ulf Böckenholt, Dan Goldstein, Jay Russo, Nikki Sullivan, Martijn Willemsen) sat down during a conference called the ‘ Choice Symposium‘ and started working on an overview paper about the history and current status of different process tracing methods.

Something about reverse inference

Often, when we run process tracing studies (e.g., eye-tracking, mouse-tracking, thinking-aloud) we talk about cognitive processes (things we can’t observe) in a way that they are actually and directly observable.

Strava

New Paper on pychodiagnosis and eye-tracking

Cilia Witteman and Nanon Spaanjaars (my dutch connection) worked together on a piece on whether psychodiagnosticians improve over time (they don’t) in their ability to classify symptoms to DSM categories. This turned out to be a pretty cool paper combining eye-tracking data with a practical, and hopefully, relevant question.

the way I am seen, by people who know (and like) me

about illusions

Andrew Gelman talked about a really old paper I did together with Anton Kühberger ages ago. It was actually the first paper / ‘real’ scientific project I was involved in.

Moving an idea into business

Recently Ryan Murphy and myself realised that a startup here in Berlin features ideas of our 2011 Flashlight paper. Well, the guys at attensee.com did a great job taking the idea we had much further we ever thought one would be able to take it …